What can the Cold War teach us about strategic competition? A conversation with historian Hal Brands

What can the Cold War teach us about strategic competition? A conversation with historian Hal Brands

When

9.00am–10.00am

10 February 2022

Type

Webinar

Challenges the United States faces with China and Russia are frequently, and adamantly, argued to either constitute a new Cold War or not. Leading historian and former Pentagon advisor, Hal Brands, takes a different approach altogether in his new book, The Twilight Struggle: What the Cold War Teaches Us about Great Power Rivalry Today. He posits that regardless of the accuracy of Cold War comparisons, the United States should look to the history of the Cold War for lessons in how to succeed in great power rivalry today. Both the Biden and Trump administrations came to embrace US-China competition, but what should be the ultimate end goal? How should the US approach to such competition in the near term differ from a long-term approach? Where do US allies like Australia fit into this strategic debate?

The United States Studies Centre hosted an event with Hal Brands in conversation with USSC Senior Lecturer Dr Gorana Grgic as we unpack what history has to teach about the latest stage in great power rivalry and the future of US foreign policymaking.

Featuring

  • Professor Hal Brands
    Professor Hal Brands
    Henry A. Kissinger Distinguished Professor of Global Affairs, Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies

    Hal Brands is a Henry A. Kissinger Distinguished Professor of Global Affairs at the Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies.

  • Dr Gorana Grgic
    Dr Gorana Grgic
    Senior Lecturer in US Politics and Foreign Policy, United States Studies Centre (jointly appointed with the Department of Government and International Relations, University of Sydney)

    Dr Gorana Grgic is a jointly appointed Senior Lecturer at the Department of Government and International Relations and the United States Studies Centre. Her research interests include US politics and foreign policy, transatlantic relations, conflict resolution and democratisation. She is the author of Ethnic Conflict in Asymmetric Federations (Routledge 2017).