The Sovereignty Wars: Reconciling America with the world

When

5.30pm–6.30pm

16 April 2019

Where

Auditorium Level 1, Administration Building, City Road corner Eastern Avenue, University of Sydney

Type

Public forum

A cornerstone of the Trump administration’s foreign policy has been a determination to defend the United States from perceived assaults and infringements on its national sovereignty. But how big a threat do international organisations and treaties really pose to US independence and freedom of action? A closer look reveals that US sovereignty, properly understood, can be reconciled with the multilateral cooperation urgently needed to address global problems.

Stewart M. Patrick's book The Sovereignty Wars places the Trump administration's obsession with sovereignty in historical perspective, showing how it is part of an enduring debate over how to reconcile America with the world. It argues that an overly narrow conception of sovereignty is ultimately self-defeating, hindering the nation from pursuing its destiny in a global age.

Stewart M. Patrick, the James H. Binger Senior Fellow in Global Governance and Director of the International Institutions and Global Governance Program at the Council on Foreign Relations, discussed his book and these issues in a conversation with USSC Non-Resident Senior Fellow Elsina Wainwright at this event.

Featuring

  • Stewart M. Patrick
    Stewart M. Patrick
    Senior Fellow, Council on Foreign Relations

    Stewart M. Patrick is James H. Binger senior fellow in global governance and director of the International Institutions and Global Governance Program at the Council on Foreign Relations.

  • Dr Elsina Wainwright, AM
    Dr Elsina Wainwright, AM
    Non-Resident Senior Fellow, Foreign Policy and Defence Program, United States Studies Centre

    Elsina Wainwright is a Non-Resident Senior Fellow of the United States Studies Centre's Foreign Policy and Defence Program. She is also a Non-Resident Fellow at New York University's Center on International Cooperation (CIC).

The Foreign Policy and Defence Program receives funding support from the following partners