Indo-Pacific Strategic Futures Dialogue and Simulation + Next Generation Leaders Workshop

Day 1: Monday 12 August 2019

InterContinental Hotel, 117 Macquarie Street, Sydney

08.30

Registration

09.00

Introduction: Implementing Indo-Pacific Strategy

Ashley Townshend
Director, Foreign Policy and Defence, United States Studies Centre

09.30

Keynote: The United States’ Vision for Indo-Pacific Strategy

Ambassador Arthur B. Culvahouse Jr.
United States Ambassador to Australia

10.00

Coffee break

10.30

Session 1: Regional Perspectives on Indo-Pacific Strategic Objectives

There is an emerging consensus among US allies and partners that a free, open, stable and prosperous Indo-Pacific is in the interests of all nations and must be preserved. Beyond this broad vision for regional order, however, are a wide range of differences in national priorities, proximate interests, views about rules, norms and values, and geographic considerations. How do key regional countries define Indo-Pacific strategy and its objectives? To what extent are the aims of different Indo-Pacific strategies aligned on core issues of security, geoeconomics and regional diplomacy? Are national differences in these overlapping visions a problem for regional strategy formation and, if so, how can they be bridged?

Alan Dupont
CEO, Cognoscenti Group

hafiah Muhibat
Head of Department of International Relations, Centre for Strategic and International Studies Indonesia

Rajeswari Rajagopalan
Distinguished Fellow & Head, Nuclear & Space Policy Initiative, Observer Research Foundation

Haruko Satoh
Professor, Osaka School of International Public Policy

Amy Searight
Senior Adviser and Director, Southeast Asia Program, Center for Strategic and International Studies

12.00

Lunch

13.00

Session 2: Strategic Futures Simulation Part A

  • 13.00 Introduction to simulation
  • 13.30 Strategic planning

14.30

Session 3: Strategic Futures Simulation Part B

  • 14.30 Briefing
  • 14.45 Simulation

15.45

Coffee break

16.00

Session 3: Strategic Futures Simulation Part B continued

  • 16.00 Plenary
  • 17.00 Rebalance
  • 17.30 End of session

18.15

Transport to conference dinner

18.30

Dinner

PwC, Level 17, One International Towers, Watermans Quay, Barangaroo

On the record

21.30

End of Day 1

 

 

Day 2: Tuesday 13 August 2019

InterContinental Hotel, 117 Macquarie Street, Sydney

09.00

Session 4: Strategic Futures Simulation Part C

  • 09.00 Briefing
  • 09.15 Simulation

10.15

Coffee break

10.30

Session 4: Strategic Futures Simulation Part C continued

  • 10.30 Plenary
  • 11.30 Rebalance

12.00

Australian Keynote Address

Peter Varghese AO

12.30

Lunch

13.15

Session 5: Strategic Futures Simulation Part D

  • 13.15 Briefing
  • 13.30 Simulation
  • 14.30 Plenary

15.15

Coffee break

15.30

Session 6: Implementing a Collective Regional Strategy

As the US, Australia and other Indo-Pacific nations progress from strategy formation to policy implementation, decisionmakers must consider how to operationalise national ways and means to achieve strategic ends. This requires identifying obstacles to policy coordination and addressing these through sustainable, sensitive and creative initiatives. Despite some recent successes this remains a challenge due to differences in threat perceptions, public opinions, available resources, thresholds for action and bureaucratic organisation. How can these obstacles be overcome to facilitate collective action in strategic, geoeconomic and diplomatic domains? What policy initiatives would advance this agenda? How can agreement be brokered among likeminded partners to collectively operationalise such initiatives?

Simulation lessons learned: Zack Cooper
Research Fellow, American Enterprise Institute

Military and geopolitics: William Choong
Shangri-La Dialogue Senior Fellow for Asia-Pacific Security, International Institute for Strategic Studies (IISS-Asia)

Politics and public opinion: Huong Le Thu
Senior Analyst, Defence and Strategy Program, Australian Strategic Policy Institute

Geoeconomics and governance: Evan Feigenbaum
Vice President for Studies, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace

Regional order-building: Joanne Wallis
Senior Lecturer and Director of Studies, Strategic and Defence Studies Centre, Australian National University

17.00

End of session

18.00

Public panel and media event

The Mint, 10 Macquarie St Sydney

On the record

19.00

End of Day 2

 

 

Day 3: Wednesday 14 August 2019

Next Generation Leaders Workshop (selected participants only)

Auditorium, Administration Building, City Road (corner Eastern Avenue), University of Sydney

11.30

Welcome: The United States, Australia and the Indo-Pacific

Ashley Townshend

11.40

Panel 1: Allied and Partner Perspectives on Indo-Pacific Strategy

There is an emerging consensus among US allies and partners that a free, open, stable and prosperous Indo-Pacific is in the interests of all nations and must be preserved. Beyond this broad vision for regional order, however, are a wide range of differences in national priorities, interests, views about rules, norms and values, and geographic considerations. How do regional nations define Indo-Pacific strategy and its objectives? To what extent are the aims of Indo-Pacific countries aligned on issues of security, geoeconomics and regional diplomacy? What are their common strategic goals?

Jay Batongbacal
Director, Institute for Maritime Affairs & Law of the Sea, University of the Philippines

Susanna Blume
Director, Defense Program, Center for a New American Security

Sumathy Permal
Fellow and Head of Centre for Straits of Malacca, Maritime Institute of Malaysia

12.20

Panel 2: Next Generation Leaders Debate Indo-Pacific Futures

As the Indo-Pacific region evolves in the direction of a more multipolar order, the US-Australia alliance will also need to change to address a range of new strategic, geoeconomic and regional challenges and opportunities. What are the most pressing considerations regarding the future of the ANZUS alliance for next generation leaders from the US and Australia? How should the alliance adapt to a more multipolar region? What should be its main security, geoeconomic, and diplomatic roles? How should US and Australian leaders communicate the enduring value and changing role of the alliance to younger generations? Are there other aspects of the US-Australia relationship that could be leveraged to advance a free, open, stable and prosperous Indo-Pacific region?

Jay Andrew
Senior Policy Adviser, International Engagement, Department of Premier and Cabinet Victoria

Katherine Mansted
Senior Adviser, National Security College, Australian National University

Georgia Tree
Adviser, Office of Madeleine King MP, Shadow Minister for Trade

Genevieve Paterson
Assistant Director, Southeast Asia Division, Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade

13.00

Lunch and networking

13.30

End of Day 3

 

 

Days 1 and 2 of this event will be conducted under the Chatham House rule of non-attribution (unless otherwise indicated above). Day 3 will be on the record.

This event is supported by the US Department of State

Department of State